The Telecaster Thinline and Telecaster Custom were now joined by the Telecaster Deluxe, which featured two humbucking pickups, a Stratocaster-style headstock and a choice of hard-tail or tremolo bridge. The James Burton Foundation. 228 likes. All in all, the Telecaster was a great success story in the decade of its birth. James Edward Burton (born August 21, 1939, in Dubberly, Louisiana) is an American guitarist.A member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame since 2001 (his induction speech was given by longtime fan Keith Richards), Burton has also been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame and the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum.Critic Mark Demming writes that "Burton has a well-deserved reputation as … Embedded content: https://www.youtube.com/embed/mJK-fXBeJkQ?rel=0, The Clash was also at its artistic and commercial peak in the first half of the 1980s. ", Embedded content: https://www.youtube.com/embed/mq7y2xjoav0?rel=0, And in what is widely regarded as the greatest rock ‘n’ roll film ever made, 1956’s The Girl Can’t Help It, the Telecaster (in its single-pickup Esquire version) puts in a pair of appearances. There have been many memorable stints with the likes of Emmylou Harris, John Denver and even Elvis Costello in between, but these days his biggest motivating force is the James Burton Foundation. Fender instruments and amps were fun, tough and affordable rather than delicate and expensive. The Telecaster charged into its fourth decade of indispensability on the crest of a wave of revitalized U.K. rock and pop. Save this search. The mid-1970s saw some of the most diverse use the Telecaster has ever been put to. 1-16 of 18 results for "james burton telecaster" "james burton telecaster" Embedded content: https://www.youtube.com/embed/rf2e4QPPxJY?rel=0. “It was held at the Municipal Auditorium in Shreveport… there’s so much history in that building, it’s incredible. Sometimes we’d play all night, and just take a nap if we had time. Like Buchanan, Richards bestowed a nickname on this guitar—“Micawber,” after a character in Dickens’ David Copperfield. The color of the pickguard was changed from black to white in 1954; its pickup selector switch tip was changed from the original round type to the “top hat” type in 1955. One of the earliest “mods” for expanding Telecaster tones dates back to the ’60s and James Burton, who discovered the out-of-phase glories of his stock-wired, late-’50s Telecaster by accident while backing up Ricky Nelson. Embedded content: https://www.youtube.com/embed/ChYI7u8CRXM?rel=0. This model proved reasonably popular, as several prominent guitarists had started modding their Telecasters with humbucking pickups (especially at the neck position) in the late 1960s. Harrison played this guitar on the final Beatles album, Let It Be, and played it atop the London headquarters of the Beatles’ company, Apple, during the famous Jan. 20, 1969, rooftop concert that would be the Beatles’ final live performance (as seen in 1970 documentary Let It Be). After a year on the Hayride, Burton’s distinctive style was fully formed. He simply worked on another level, coaxing jaw-dropping solos, haunting cello-like volume swells, and otherworldly harmonic and feedback sounds from his main instrument, a 1953 Telecaster he nicknamed “Nancy.” Many who saw him came away convinced that they’d just seen the world’s greatest guitarist. With Lover’s Fender Wide Range humbucking pickups successfully in place on the Thinline model, Fender simply stuck one in the neck position on a solid-body Telecaster, added a new pickguard design, upper bout pickup toggle switch and a new four-knob control layout, and there it was—the Telecaster Custom, introduced in 1972.